Emotional Control in Surgical and Intensive Care Nursing: Sociodemographic Differences

  • Stana Pačarić Faculty of Medicine, University of Osijek; Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Osijek, Croatia
  • Ana Nemčić Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Osijek, Croatia
  • Nikolina Farčić* Faculty of Medicine, University of Osijek; Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Osijek, Croatia
  • Vanja Trazer Department of Surgery, University Hospital Centre Osijek, Croatia

Abstract

Aim: To determine whether there is a difference in the impact of emotion on memory, behaviour, thinking and mood with regard to age, gender, level of education and length of service.


Methods: Research included 105 nurses. It was conducted anonymously by a standardized Emotional Regulation and Control Questionnaire (ERIK).


Results: Average rating on the scale was somewhat lower for men, respondents under 30 years of age and respondents with a university degree. Average rating on the emotional regulation and control scale were significantly higher for respondents with 31 and more years of service (Kruskal-Wallis test, p=0.046). Regarding male respondents, there is a significant correlation of age (Spearman's correlation coefficient, =0.429, p=0.020) and length of service (Spearman's correlation coefficient, =0.412, p=0.026) with their overall score on the scale. Regarding female correspondents, there is no significant correlation between age and their overall score on the emotional regulation and control scale and sub-scales. Considering the age of respondents, results indicate that the decrease in the ability to control emotional reactions is proportional to the increase in age, but not to a significant degree. Regarding elderly respondents, the value of emotional regulation and control is higher in comparison to younger respondents (Spearman's correlation coefficient, =0.440, p=0.017).


Conclusion: Increase in length of service decreases the ability to control emotional reactions and there are no significant differences in emotional control with regard to gender, age and educational background.


(Pačarić S, Nemčić A, Farčić N, Trazer V. Emotional Control in Surgical and Intensive Care Nursing: Sociodemographic Differences. SEEMEDJ 2018; 2(2); 1-7)


 


Key words: emotional intelligence, self-control, nurses, thinking

Published
Mar 21, 2019
How to Cite
PAČARIĆ, Stana et al. Emotional Control in Surgical and Intensive Care Nursing: Sociodemographic Differences. Southeastern European Medical Journal, [S.l.], v. 2, n. 2, p. 1-7, mar. 2019. ISSN 2459-9484. Available at: <http://seemedj.mefos.unios.hr/index.php/seemedj/article/view/76>. Date accessed: 12 dec. 2019. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.26332/seemedj.v2i2.76.
Section
Articles