Overview of Iodine Intake

(Review article)

  • Vanja Vasiljev* University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Rijeka, Croatia
  • Alen Subotić Institute of Emergency Medicine of Zagreb County, Zagreb, Croatia
  • Mihaela Marinović Glavić University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Rijeka, Croatia
  • Denis Juraga University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Rijeka, Croatia
  • Lovorka Bilajac University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Rijeka, Croatia; Teaching Institute of Public Health of Primorje-Gorski Kotar County, Rijeka, Croatia
  • Bojan Jelaković University Hospital Centre Zagreb, Department of Nephrology, Arterial Hypertension, Dialysis and Transplantation, Zagreb, Croatia; University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia
  • Tomislav Rukavina University of Rijeka, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Social Medicine and Epidemiology, Rijeka, Croatia; Teaching Institute of Public Health of Primorje-Gorski Kotar County, Rijeka, Croatia

Abstract

Iodine is an essential element for human health. Food is the primary source of iodine, but the iodine content of local foods depends on the iodine content of the soil. Therefore, a low iodine concentration in soil and water results in plants and animals with low iodine content. Numerous effects of iodine deficiency on growth and development are known as iodine deficiency disorders. Iodine deficiency has been identified as the most common cause of brain damage in the world and is linked to its effects on infant and child growth and development. Supplementation of table salt with iodine was introduced in the 20th century. Croatia was one of the first countries to introduce the supplementation of table salt with potassium iodide at a concentration of 10 mg/kg in 1953 and 25 mg/kg in 1993. In 2003, the Croatian population reached iodine sufficiency, but given the excessive salt intake (11.6 g/day) and additional sources of iodine in the diet, the question arises, are we consuming too much iodine? This article gives a short overview of iodine intake.

Published
Apr 27, 2022
How to Cite
VASILJEV*, Vanja et al. Overview of Iodine Intake. Southeastern European Medical Journal, [S.l.], v. 6, n. 1, p. 12-20, apr. 2022. ISSN 2459-9484. Available at: <http://seemedj.mefos.unios.hr/index.php/seemedj/article/view/241>. Date accessed: 03 july 2022. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.26332/seemedj.v6i1.241.
Section
Articles